Bull Terrier Puppies

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What else should you know about adopting Bull Terrier puppies?

Bull Terrier Puppies

A balanced nutrition is the foundation of a healthy Bull Terrier

Health & Nutrition

Especially regarding the widespread allergy issues in Bull Terriers experience shows that prevention or improvement can rise and fall with the right or wrong nutrition. Wrong in this case means foods that contain high contents of grains (such as most low-cost kibble foods do). But there are also other factors to be considered.
They can exponentiate the problems, which is not only true for Bull Terriers.
To be on the safer side right from the start, it is a wise decision to feed a grain-free and high quality food to your dog. Wet in general goes before kibble, because it is closer to the natural historical nutrition of dogs – provided you choose a good quality brand. But kibble also remains an option, if choosing a good quality brand.
There are great resources for that. The website dogfoodadvisor.com holds a lot of very useful information available about dog foods and can help to identify the good brands.
Also adding vitamins, fish oil and maybe probiotics are a good idea in a healthy Bull Terrier diet.


Exercise

Bull Terriers are very agile and energetic. They need an outlet for their huge amount of energy. Walking them alone can not be considered exercise. You can of course walk your Bully, just don’t consider him exercised when you’re back home. UNLESS you try to make it real fun for him, he will probably not really see the fun in walking. The Bull Terrier needs interaction with his people and a lot of diversion and entertainment. This distinguishes them from some other, more leaned back breeds. The are often characterized as independent thinkers, even hard to train.

In my experience it all depends on how you handle them.
Your Bully will need consistency, knowing who’s the boss and who makes the rules. He needs to KNOW clearly what he is doing right and what he’s doing wrong and needs the time and chance to figure things out and adapt.

Bull Terriers are like raw diamonds. If you use the wrong polishing tactics you will only get a pile of carbon. If you use the right tactics and commit to LIVING WITH your Bully, instead of just owning A DOG, you will get the most precious and loving pet you can imagine as the reward for your efforts.

Find more tips on how to entertain your dog here

5 thoughts on “Bull Terrier Puppies

  1. Pingback: The eyes of dogs and their vision

  2. Hello,

    We just got a little miniature bully. And our concern is. He only plays with ball for a short period of time and don’t chase toys or people. He just laying down.;( is he ok? Bully’s suppose to be very active.

    • While English Bull Terriers are notorious for being very active, even for this breed the following is true:
      Besides the disposition of a certain breed, activity levels also depend on several different factors, such as age, nutrition, health and environment (hot summer, cold winter …).
      I would need to know much more details to answer your question. But if you really think that he is much less active than other Bull Terriers of his age I would probably recommend to get him to a vet for a check up anyway, just to make sure the little one is physically ok.

  3. Hello I have my male bull terrier who jut turned a year now. We socialized him early as possible where he got along with all dogs, never bit back. Now for the past month he gets aggressive with dogs. He starts off wanting to play with them. When he plays with them for at least 30 seconds than he gets aggressive. Once we stop him he cries for the other dog. We can’t find the issue but this has been going on. He has always been a people and dog lover but now we are afraid I take him back to the dog park. Any ideas? THank you

    • Hello Ashley,
      that is textbook adolescent Bull Terrier attitude. When maturing, especially males tend to really push their limits and challenge owners and other individuals in order to find out what they can get through with.
      You did not describe the “aggression” in detail. So it is a little hard to tell from afar if you have already reached the point where your dog actually attacks and bites others or if he is basically “just” going over them, mounting and dominating them, no matter if male or female. If biting is involved I would first skip meeting other dogs in uncontrolled places, such as dog parks, and put all of my efforts into working on the issue under controlled circumstances, ideally with a trainer.

      Basically, you are absolutely right about not wanting to tolerate dominance and aggressive behavior, especially when exhibited pro-actively by your Bull Terrier. At that age, working hard on obedience and your bond can help a lot, even if success may not be visible right away. Dominance needs to be interrupted every time immediately and playtime ends right there in order for your dog to learn that nothing good results from aggressing others.
      If no biting is involved already and you know of any other dogs, he is getting along with an not trying to dominate them, maybe it is a good idea, for now, to limit playtime with other pals to just these particular dogs. All other situations – as it sounds to me from your report – should better be avoided and only be entered very carefully and under strong supervision in the future. Also I would keep a long leash on the dog and warn the owner of the other dog that yours tends to dominate others, before they interact. The leash enhances your chance to intervene early once your dog starts to go over the top again. If the next few very cautious attempts fail and your dog seems to continue escalating its behavior every time rather than dialing back a bit, like said before, I would skip dog parks and other gathering spots for dogs for a while altogether, because chances increase that sooner or later there will be a fight, once another dog does not accept being bothered by your dog. Bull Terriers are courageous and once challenged they often do not back out of a fight, even if they were the ones who started it by bothering the other dog.

      Scientists say that dogs minds are comparable with the ones of a three year old child. And in my experience this seems to be true, sometimes resulting in irrational decisions.
      You also did not mention if your dog displays the described behavior EVERY time with EVERY dog or only in isolated cases.
      So, here’s another tohught to consider:
      If it only happens now and then it would be a great idea to really monitor the situation closely when your dog interacts with the other dog and watch, if your dog is really the one starting things or if the other dog is for example nipping ears, going over your dog or in general also showing provocative behavior.
      Also it is a good idea to watch owners. If an owner obviously does not care about what his dog is doing, think twice about letting your dog play with his dog. Because once things escalate you will be left alone with TWO dogs to handle and separate and in the worst case the only thing the other owner will have seen is your dog attacking his.
      Rather try to find people, whose dogs are getting along with your dog an who are aware of the risks, who are actively involved with theirs dogs and willing to work on the situation with you.

      One more thing to keep in mind: Some Bull Terriers have a general tendency to develop aggression or an aversion against other dogs. Right now, honestly, your situation does sound more like just adolescent quirks. But it might as well turn out that your dog is just not compatible with other dogs.
      Things should not accumulate to a serious fight to make that clear. There are lots of other preceding signs.
      General incompatibility is a possibility that should be kept in mind but if it should turn out to be the case, it would still not the world’s end. It just needs to be considered and handled and your dog needs more human play pals in that case. 🙂

      Hope it helps a little.
      Dorothea

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